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InsideView

Reaching the B2B companies that matter to your business most requires reliable access to the right company and contact data. In Episode 2 of Talk Data to Me – The DataExchange Experience, Heidi Bamburg Tucker, Vice President, Global Alliances at InsideView, highlights how InsideView maintains a fresh global dataset of every B2B public company and over 17 million private B2B companies.

Ep02: InsideView | Heidi Tucker, Vice President, Global Alliances at InsideView, Inc

With advanced matching logic and numerous ways to track when your contacts switch companies, InsideView empowers businesses to stay engaged with their most important contacts and accounts.

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John Kosturos:
All right, everybody. Welcome to today’s fireside chat. We’ve got a very special guest, Heidi Tucker, the VP of global alliances with inside view. We want to welcome you today. Hi Heidi.

Heidi Tucker:
Hi John. Thanks so much, really happy to be able to spend a little time together and share a little bit about inside view.

John Kosturos:
Absolutely. Let’s jump right in. Um, let’s ask the first question. Um, tell us a little bit about your company’s background, how long you’ve been in business and just some company history.

Heidi Tucker:
Sure. Uh, we started in 2005. Um, we looked at the sea of business data providers that were available at the time and we thought we could actually create a niche by providing more real time data, especially real time data about companies and their key executives, and then embedding it within CRM. And a lot of those things hadn’t been done at the time business data been around for 150 years, but we really saw an opportunity to make it more relevant, make it more real time by using sophisticated, um, no web based, uh, data gathering techniques. And that was, that was our origin. I don’t remember the first to embed, um, social content and company information into CRM. And then over the years we’ve continued to expand the data that we offer and then integrate with other things like marketing automation and, um, ABM and things like that.

John Kosturos:
Yeah. I’ve definitely seen you guys evolve over the years. Um, I’ve seen you at trade shows many years past and, and the companies know evolved along the way, but what is your ideal customer profile? Can you tell us a little bit about who you guys target?

Heidi Tucker:
Yeah, we, we target, uh, well, first of all, anybody who’s in B2B because we are purely a B2B dataset. Um, secondly, we really look for companies that, um, have a desire to transform actually that that’s, you know, maybe too, um, uh, you know, not really the right word, but it’s, you know, companies that are looking to find a more modern way to sell or a more modern way to go to market. So they’re looking for signals of, uh, key opportunities or they’re looking to isolate, uh, very quickly all the key decision makers or the buying committee within an organization, so they could launch an ABM campaign. So those tend to be companies that, um, are in progressive industries could be high tech. It could be transportation, logistics could be business services is a big space for us. Um, and then also, I don’t want to be a remiss in saying we power a lot of other applications to, we have a full API platform that can power cybersecurity applications, supply chain, lots of other things as well.

John Kosturos:
That’s pretty amazing. Um, kind of a redundant question, but, um, what are the typical problems you help customers solve? And again, I know you guys are very broad, so different solutions that can go a lot of ways, but

Heidi Tucker:
yeah, I would say just to give you an umbrella view of the, of the problems we solve, they’re organized, uh, largely around, um, sales challenges, uh, data hygiene challenges, and then marketing and go to market challenges. So, as I mentioned earlier, we started off as a sales intelligence application running inside of CRM. So we would help individual sales people, um, more quickly do their account planning or their account research or their, their call prep and helped them find the right prospects to go after giving them the name and the email, my email address and the title. Um, and then we evolve that, uh, our next group of problems we attack to us in the marketing space. Um, cause it turns out marketers need a lot of the same information as salespeople. They just need it at scale. So helping marketers, uh, identify the ICP, um, that they’re going after and helping them clean, you know, all their, their new leads that are coming in automatically and then helping them identify all of the lookalike, uh, prospect. So it’s just like their best customers.

John Kosturos:
Oh, sorry, go for it.

Heidi Tucker:
Yeah. I was going to say, and then the third one, we’ve just pivoted lately, especially in the middle of this pandemic more to, um, data hygiene solutions, surely because all of us have to do more with less. And we’re hearing that every day from our customers and in order to do more with less, you just have to get more efficient. You can’t hire five more salespeople, so you better make the ones you have more productive. And so that means getting your data cleaned and you can’t overlook having stale contacts or outdated industry classifications or that kind of thing.

John Kosturos:
Yeah. We’ve followed a similar journey of, you know, either getting a hold of sales or remarketing first and then, you know, crossing over departments and trying to align them. So I’m sure you have some great stories about sales and marketing alignment along that, along that journey. Um, but what verticals do you guys focus on? Like, is there a key vertical? A lot of customers I’ve been interviewing are focused on tech. Um, but is that a, is that a key vertical for you or, or, you know, what would you say are the top places, uh, types of businesses that you like to target?

Heidi Tucker:
Yeah, I mean, I think tech, um, was where we started because we’re a San Francisco based company. And, um, we were, you know, initially one of the first, um, ISBNs within the solution providers within the Salesforce ecosystem. And so there were a lot of tech companies that were making early decisions to do digital transformation or sales transformation. Um, but over the years, over the last 10 years, we’ve really branched out. And I would say some of our bigger verticals are, um, know financial services is a big vertical Mmm, uh, business services. So that would take into consideration, you know, engineering and, um, consultants and all kinds of, um, more service oriented companies. Um, we do, um, a lot of business and transportation and logistics. And, um, I’d say where we’re less focused is in, uh, pharma and biotech only because we have a very broad data set of B2B companies. Um, but we’re not as focused in healthcare as maybe some other solution providers.

John Kosturos:
Yeah. It’s a very, uh, broad niche that can require a hundred percent of your time to be good. Uh, I, I second that, um, how about geographical locations? Uh, and this is a kind of a double question in terms of where you target. Are you targeting companies that are primarily themselves in the United States? Do you have a global customer base? And then do you also have data that covers both North America and then globally?

Heidi Tucker:
Yes. We’re a global data set. We have about 17 million companies in our database around the world. It’s every public company, which is about 50,000. And then all of the rest of that millions are private companies. Um, and we have about 50 million contacts or decision maker contacts in our database. And we’re on a path to get to a hundred million contacts by the end of this year, while at the same time, maintaining our data quality and data accuracy. And you can imagine in the middle of a pandemic with everybody changing jobs, that’s, that’s a very difficult thing to do. And the only reason that we’re really confident in our ability to do it, um, better, let’s just say better than everybody else. Never a hundred percent is because we use various sophisticated, uh, AI based, um, a technology to aggregate and triangulate, which means try to find the same data in multiple places.

Heidi Tucker:
Um, and then validate things like email addresses through third party, email validation, but the only way you can achieve the accuracy at scale is to have multiple sources of data triangulate it, and, and, but to get back to your original question about geography, about half of our, um, database is in North America and about the other half is spread in other regions of the world. Um, because we’re looking to triangulate data off of multiple sources. We tend to have more data in places where companies are more digitally visible. So we would have more information about, Mmm, about tech companies or about, um, financial services companies. Then we might about, um, at a dry cleaner, for example, and, uh, in markets where there is more data available, we can validate the data more, um, more easily. So in markets like China, um, even in some region of regions of South America, it’s a little bit harder to obtain data to, to validate. So we tend to be more strong in North America and in Western Europe and English speaking companies around the world countries around the world.

John Kosturos:
Okay. That’s pretty amazing. I have a specific question about languages. What if, uh, it’s a digital culture, but the language is not an English speaking character. Can you also find in verified data places where other languages are used as the, like the primary, um, a primary language for writing?

Heidi Tucker:
Yeah, so it, it depends what data you’re talking about. Um, we do, uh, have hundreds of thousands, if not millions of companies, um, in markets where English is not the first language, but news. And the fact that we categorize news based on natural language processing to associate mergers and acquisitions or a leadership change or, uh, funding events or bankruptcies, um, that type of categorized news in our world only works with the natural language processing of English content. So we may have companies listed in China. We have lots of them. Um, in fact, we work with some of the larger supply chain, um, uh, companies, but not companies but applications, but we’re only able to present the signals or the real time news on English content.

John Kosturos:
Very nice. Um, so I was, you know, when I think of an enrichment provider, I don’t always think of verification, but you’ve been talking a lot about verification. So do you do your own verification for emails, phone numbers, and addresses?

Speaker 3:
We do a lot of verification on our own, but we also use two third party email validation providers. Um, just, it’s not our core competency, but our core competency is to obtain information from multiple sources. In fact, we, we buy our data from companies like cap IQ and Thomson Reuters and,

Heidi Tucker:
and other major reputable companies. But then we also crawl the web, looking at millions of websites every week, looking for things I could change in the leadership team that’s posted, or maybe a news about a merger or upcoming merger that hasn’t maybe been completed yet. So we’re looking for a lot of information on the websites themselves. We’re also calling information from government sites from all kinds of different places and bringing that all in together. So our core competency is to obtain all that information, triangulate it because I guarantee if we’ve got five sources for one company, all five of them will have different information. And it’s our job to figure out which is the best single source of truth. But then for email specifically, that’s one thing we do outsource our email validation. We run through our entire database of emails, uh, for validation about every two weeks.

John Kosturos:
Very nice. Um, so it sounds like you can triangulate and see if a person is current with their business. Cause like this has always been a topic for me. I think like, as a salesperson SAS, one of the best bleeds you can ever find is one of your customers who went to a new company, but like this has been even kind of it’s, it’s been, I mean, it’s an extreme right now in the situation we’re in, it’s like, who knows like 30% of your database might’ve just turned over. So do you have any sort of service where I could submit you a list of my contacts or leads or whatever and say, Hey, are these people still with this company?

Heidi Tucker:
Yeah. So the answer is, yes, we have a few different ways to solve that problem. So just logistically, uh, we have a professional services team. So if you submitted a list to us, we would have our professional services team analyze the list and clean it up and send it back to you with whatever the current information is that we have about those contacts. Um, we also have a product called data integrity that can run on your CRM and just identify on an ongoing basis when we have updated information about contacts. Well, we know that they’ve moved to another company and then we have also have API APIs that, um, can prompt you proactively when data, um, that you’re tracking has changed. But how do we, that information is that’s, that’s really the secret sauce because a lot of people use LinkedIn. We do. And it’s just a great standard of, you know, professional connections.

Heidi Tucker:
Um, but in a, in a time like this, where a lot of people aren’t at their company anymore, but they haven’t updated their LinkedIn profile. Or if you’re an executive at a company, you probably don’t really spend time, even outside of a pandemic updating your LinkedIn profile. Um, we have to figure out other ways we don’t scrape LinkedIn at all. So we have to find other ways to, to know that somebody is not at that company. And so we’re monitoring companies that are announcing layoffs, and then we’re looking at our database compared to what we’re seeing in the news. Um, and when we do identify, um, that people have moved to the other company, then we can go ahead. And sometimes we know that they’re just not there anymore, but they haven’t landed someplace. So we show them in our database as a past employment at the previous company. And then as soon as we track them to where they currently are, then we will update their current employment.

John Kosturos:
Okay.

Heidi Tucker:
ID system. I was just gonna say, so we track an employer ID for every person in our database and an executive ID, executive ideas sort, sorta like your social security number. It follows you everywhere. You go from company to company, employment ID is assigned to you when you’re at a specific company

John Kosturos:
that’s super valuable. Um, you know, it’s, it’s a rare combination of both enrichment as well as I call it, like monitor or refresh, whatever you, you know, you, you phrase it, but that’s a super powerful feature. Now question about the size of the database, how many business and person records are available in the database.

Heidi Tucker:
So today we have about 17 million companies, uh, globally, as I mentioned, about half, those are in the U S or in North America. And then we have about 50 million contacts in the database and not all of them have email addresses where we’re obviously trying to get as many email addresses as we can. Uh, but sometimes we can’t, we might get the email address. We can’t validate it. So then we’re not public populating it into the, um, into the database, but we’re about 60 plus percent with email coverage as well. And, and then we, as I think I mentioned earlier, we’re going to a hundred million contacts by the end of 2020, um, with a commensurate level of email addresses, we have about 10 million direct dial phone numbers. And then we have about a hundred percent coverage on corporate phone numbers.

John Kosturos:
Yeah. One of the things I think was rare about you guys is that you have a pretty flexible matching logic as for the customer. So some companies limit to specific fields values as an input to get an output. Um, and I was surprised to see that you guys can be pretty flexible. It’s your matching logic either through the API or obviously through the services, but, um, can you tell us a little bit about what the minimum fields you need are to, um, you know, get an output from, uh, enrichment? Is it a combination name and, you know, give us that

Heidi Tucker:
well. So for, for a company, uh, literally we just need the name of the company. Uh, it will produce a higher scoring match if we have more fields, um, such as the company and the country or the company and the URL or the company and the stock ticker, um, you know, the more you can feed into it, the more of an accurate match you’re likely to get. Cause if you just give me Acme printing, I mean, we’ve got so many, you know, Acme printings in our database that I don’t really know exactly which one you’re looking for. And I’ll give you a really quick example on that. We had a customer come to us recently. And one of the records they had in this large dataset was a Fitbit comment LTD in San Francisco at California USA. Well, it actually, we know there is no Fitbit comma LTD in the United States.

Heidi Tucker:
Fitbit LTD is actually the UK subsidiary of Fitbit Fitbit comma, inc, is located in San Francisco. It’s the corporate headquarters of Fitbit. So when a customer gives us a name that is, um, not congruent can grow us with the, um, the name or with the address, we have to be able to figure out what are they really talking about? Do they really want the U S company or they really want the UK company and, you know, which has more weight in the algorithm is of the name of the company or the company plus the address. I mean, that’s just one small example of the types of, um, challenges that we have in matching.

John Kosturos:
Okay.

Heidi Tucker:
But clearly more than just URL, a lot of people don’t have URLs. If you can only do a URL match, um, you’re not going to match on nearly as many as we can. You use these other fields.

John Kosturos:
Yeah, I agree. And RingLead actually has a unique, um, application that upends websites based on rules. It’s a, it’s a crawling technology. That’s, you know, it’s accurate and obviously handpicking and is better, but, you know, um, but that’s so important. I mean, for everybody watching to have flexibility in your matching, what that means is you’re going to find less mismatches first and, and a second more, uh, the more, uh, flexibility you have within that logic, which it sounds like, you know, you guys really have a lot of flexibility. You’ll get, um, both scores on match rates and then you’ll find more matches in general because the tool will be looking at more attributes. Um, so go for it.

Heidi Tucker:
I was gonna say, and on, on contacts, uh, we need first name, last name, company, or first name, well actually first name, last name, company, or email address. Um, we will be able to match on either of those, uh, and then return about 40 fields of information just from that. So we could return, um, you know, the, the company information, the job level, the job function, the industry classification size of company. So one of the things we do a lot is just a pen web forms. A lot of companies just have inside view, enrich running on their web form so that they only have to ask for one or two or three of them, most fields of information. Uh, they can get a much higher completion rate because people don’t really like to fill out much information manually, as you know, uh, so the less you asked, uh, the more likely they’ll they’ll complete it, and then we can match it on our backend.

John Kosturos:
Yeah. So it sounds like not only are you flexible in your matching, but you guys also have an API just for about everything we’ve talked about today, which is, you know, very helpful with just being flexible in terms of where you can pipe the data. Um, you know, I see a lot of our, our audience is really using this data, not just to personalize and segment, but, um, and connect, but also to build out profiles, like what is our ideal customer profile. Um, and I think that, you know, across all these different customers, different attributes, what I would call specialty attributes become important in this exercise. So I want to ask you, what kind of specialty attributes do you have outside of just the traditional, like size of business and, you know, vertical I E like news, uh, tech installs, financing, intent, budgets, et cetera. Can you give us some unique business attributes or personnel attributes that, um, you know, that you guys serve?

Heidi Tucker:
Yeah. So I can answer that in two ways. One is with, uh, unique fields that we have on our record. So, uh, a company record at complete company record at inside view has about 40 or it’s 40 or 50 now, um, fields of information that we can deliver. And it would include all of the basic firmographics, um, you know, size and, and URL. Uh, but we also have SIC codes, NAICS codes, British snakes codes. And we have our own industry classification. That’s built on a very modern way of looking at industries. Cause some of those government classifications are really old and it makes it hard to declassify current companies into that old standard. So we have our own about 30 primary industries and about 307 histories that look at things like, is Uber a tech company or a Zuber, a transportation company? Well, they’re really both.

Heidi Tucker:
And so, um, so industry has a specialty. Uh, we do tech installed data. We have social profiles and we have things like, um, I think it’s called MIBI Weeby, which is the compliance classifications, like women owned business and minority owned business, things like that. So a L a lot of unique fields, um, Oh, I should have also mentioned that the parent and then global ultimate parent, we have very well developed family tree hierarchies. And so if you’re looking to aggregate assets under one global parent, and that’s one of the things we do quite a bit, uh, for lead to account mapping, or just to help companies really understand, um, where their revenue is concentrated. Um, and then the other thing I was going to mention really quickly is we do have a solution that, that identifies ICP. And it’s a, it’s a prepackaged solution where a customer can upload a list of their best customers.

Heidi Tucker:
However, they identify it. Let’s just say it’s the top 20% of their customers that pay them more money than anybody else. They can upload that list into apex, which is the name of our solution. And, um, once they hit submit, apex comes back and it shows all of the common characteristics, Oh, those, those companies that were on the list. So you can see what are the industries that they’re in, where are they located, geography geographically, and what’s the size and number of employees that they have. And then you can hit, um, one more button and apex will return all of the prospects that look just like the ICP that you just, you just determined. And to do that ICP, we’re employing specialties that are a little bit more nuanced than what I described earlier. So we we’ve built a specialties around the way companies talk about themselves on their website. And what are the key words? If, if you’re GE capital, you are in a lot of different businesses. So we couldn’t just count you and categorize that as one type of company. So these specialties are around types of insurance that you, that the company might specialize in, or a type of specific type of engineering or something like that. And we use those to then determine the lookalike prospects.

John Kosturos:
That’s pretty amazing. So, uh, I got two more questions for you. One is around hierarchies, cause it’s very unique to see a company that has structure around business hierarchies. And, um, you know, is that something that you guys offer and if so, does it have any, you know, unique, uh, is there any thing unique about it?

Heidi Tucker:
Yeah, there is definitely something we offer. We have been building our own family tree hierarchy since 2005. And the reason that we wanted to build our own is that we, we felt like salespeople needed to know, right. When an acquisition was announced that something was happening. Um, what we saw in the market prior to that were very formal hierarchies that might not actually show an acquisition til six months or a year later when it’s a hundred percent finally approved and, and merged in with the parent company. And we felt like that that’s not that helpful if you’re out selling to companies, you need to know right away that there was M and a activity just announced. So we started building these and, um, what we’re able to do there, few unique things about our family trees. Um, one is, if you’re looking for contacts, you can actually search for contacts by title or by level across the whole family tree.

Heidi Tucker:
So not just looking at Nike, but everyone at Nike subsidiaries to find that head of digital transformation or whatever you’re looking for. Um, the second thing is we interact with CRM, um, both dynamics and Salesforce to allow a user to import the whole family tree hierarchy into their CRM, so that you can then start to look at all of the accounts that should be grouped under one global account manager for a territory alignment. Um, so I, I could go on and on about our family trees. Uh, they’re, they’re very sophisticated. Um, and, and it’s challenging because you have, you have some trees that are based on brands like Marriott hotel, for example, there are lots and lots of Marriott hotels that licensed the brand Marriott, but they’re not really part of the Marriott family. [inaudible] we have to know all of those differences.

John Kosturos:
Yeah. That’s a big, uh, big problem to tackle. Um, and there’s only a handful of companies even trying it. So, um, I am very interested to hear feedback on, on how that works and even try it myself Mount my last question. Um, we very thankful for having you today is if I want to try inside view or get some analysis done, do you have any sort of offering for analyzing data analyzing ideal customer profiles or even possibly, you know, testing a file or a, or an API key or something like that? How do I, without much friction get into your kind of funnel?

Heidi Tucker:
Yeah. Um, it’s pretty easy since you’ve mentioned API APIs, we have a free API trial. Uh, you just go to inside view.com forward slash API, and, um, you’ll find the button to get started with an API trial. Uh, there’s a lot of very simple and easy to read documentation that will also be linked to that API trial. Um, and then also somebody is, as soon as you sign up for the trial, somebody will reach out and give you a call and just see if you need any help, have any questions that need to be answered. Um, with our products, uh, we have similar trials, almost every one of our products has a 30 day free trial. So you can just get started and you’re accessing real data just to Mmm. See if it’s working for your particular situation. Um, and then you mentioned also lists that we have what’s called a data diagnostic. So if you reach out to us and you can reach us@partnersatinsideview.com or sales@insightview.com, uh, we will take a list and we can very, very quickly analyze that list and then return some summary statistics about how many records were we able to match and how what’s the fill rate, how many records could we correct or improve if we were to go through and do the analysis for you?

John Kosturos:
Well, that sounds like, um, a lot of access. I remember a long time ago when I first started Salesforce, you know, setting up Salesforce org is about 11 years ago. I installed the free inside view app. So I could see how my reps could see how big companies were and make social connections and they have a pretty cool freemium. Um, and it, it didn’t expire at the time. So it’s like a really, you got a lot of value from it. I think it’s really unique to allow API access, you know, for anybody who also uses RingLead that actually connects directly into RingLead. So all the connectors are prebuilt, um, and again, inside views team is amazing. They can help you build your own custom integrations as well. And then just generally, I think, you know, for small, medium, large business, um, inside view, it seems like she’s got a very broad and detailed offering that, you know, can do anything from analyze to help find and build or cleanse and, and work on a hygiene. And, and, uh, we really appreciate you, you know, uh, giving us all this access to information today, Heidi and joining us on the show. So you very much

Heidi Tucker:
you’re welcome, John, anytime we really appreciate our partnership with RingLead. And even though it’s relatively new, uh, you know, just five or six months old, we’re really excited about where we can take it together.

John Kosturos:
How’s our, we have a wonderful there.

Heidi Tucker:
All right. Thanks you too. Bye. Bye.

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